Crispin Ward introduced and conducted Vaughan Williams Lark Ascending, written in 1914, with the poem by George Meredith from which it takes its title. Zoltán Takács realized the piece wonderfully, his violin rising and soaring, the playing delicate, sensitive yet animated, standing out from the background yet part of the overall musical texture. The Orchestra, generally restrained but expansive where appropriate, included distinguished support from woodwind and brass. Finally, left on its own, the solo violin faded into the clear blue sky. A heartfelt performance. Following the interval, Zoltán Takács revealed the more extrovert side of his musical personality with Bartok’s 1st Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra. Rich in folk melodies and harmonies, the rhythmic vitality of the piece was energetically realized by both soloist and orchestra.

Takacs was conjuring feelings...he played two familiar pieces by Saint-Saëns...freely, with temperament, yet with extreme softness. Takacs also showed his technical virtuosity, and the compositions seemed as if they had been made for him. We shall welcome this virtuoso of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra again...

The Hungarian conductor and soloist is a pleasant and the same time an intresting personality...he played the Four Seasons by Vivaldi in a mellow way, yet also vigorously and steadfastly. One could not help pf thinking of a Hungarian violin primas, who ( for instance in a luxurious Hungarian restaurant ) walks among the listeners and does his best, plays with capacity and with fever emotions...

In the final number Kaija Saarikettu ( professor of the Sibelius Academy ) and Zoltan Takacs were inspired into a staggering virtuosity, a scintillating performance, a beutiful culmination for a good concert...

Zoltán Takács, the leader on “Absence," is a warm, sensitive musician who brings in a virtuosic depth to the ballad. Lahti clasps the thread on the saxophone and passes it on to Süle. The ensemble locks in and passion becomes the keyword. The music captivates....